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February 21, 2006

Pneumothorax From Acupuncture - A Reason for Regulation of Acu in Hong Kong

Found this article as an interesting call for an Acupuncture regulatory board, using rising Pneumothorax rates as an incentive. The article states that they are underreported and they could be avoided with a board of regulation and "safety" needles. Red Orbit Article Here

Aside: I'm sorry but safety needles? It's called use smaller needles. If you're sticking a needle in BL15 or 45 use a freaking half-inch needle if you don't know for sure how deep to go. I don't understand the pneumothorax craze. In America they are also underreported, but mostly because they're being done by Physician Acupuncturists 2 to 1.

Posted by Admin at 10:52 AM | Comments (0)

Pneumothorax From Acupuncture - A Reason for Regulation of Acu in Hong Kong

Found this article as an interesting call for an Acupuncture regulatory board, using rising Pneumothorax rates as an incentive. The article states that they are underreported and they could be avoided with a board of regulation and "safety" needles. Red Orbit Article Here

Aside: I'm sorry but safety needles? It's called use smaller needles. If you're sticking a needle in BL15 or 45 use a freaking half-inch needle if you don't know for sure how deep to go. I don't understand the pneumothorax craze. In America they are also underreported, but mostly because they're being done by Physician Acupuncturists 2 to 1.

Posted by Admin at 10:52 AM | Comments (3)

February 17, 2006

Acupressure 1, Physical Therapy 0

Taiwanese researchers published a study in the British Medical Journal comparing acupressure (not Acupuncture) to physical therapy for 129 patients with chronic lower back pain at an orthopedic clinic in Kaohsiung. The patients received six sessions of acupressure over a month, or PT. Acupressure kicked butt. Things I don't have are what they mean by PT (exercise or tens) and what points they used for acupressure. The interesting thing is that the results stayed true at 6 month follow up. Imagine if they used Acupuncture! AFP Article Here

Posted by Admin at 11:00 AM | Comments (1)

February 15, 2006

RedOrbit - Health - No Substitute for Anaesthesia, Say Experts

For those of you who don't know how Acupuncture reportedly came to America, the story goes that reporter James Reston had to have an emergency appendectomy. Reston was covering Henry Kissinger's trip in 1971 to China for the Nixon administration. After the emergency surgery, they administered Acupuncture to reduce his pain levels, to which Reston responded quite well. He then came back to the states and wrote this article proclaiming the magic of Acupuncture: Now, Let Me Tell You About My Appendectomy in Peking.

A recent interview was done with experts on the current state of "Acupuncture Anesthesia" in China, and how it's just not that popular anymore. Red Orbit article here.

Posted by Admin at 12:18 PM | Comments (0)

February 14, 2006

Branching Out - Western Herbs: Saw Palmetto a Dud for BPH

The New England Journal of Medicine just published a study showing that Saw Palmetto is no better than placebo for enlarged prostates (benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH). The study used a much larger group for a longer duration than any previous study, and claimed to be very specific in choosing a placebo that was pungent enough to truly mimic the smell of Saw Palmetto (to the point that 46% of placebo takers thought it was, versus 40% of the actual herb takers).

What struck my eyes, was this quote from the PO Stephen Bent, MD: "This is a surprising finding that contradicts the weight of prior evidence," he observes. "There is good reason for other researchers to conduct another study to validate these results, taking care that blinding is done carefully once again. Some people believe that higher doses may be potentially effective, and that's an area that we did not address. "

I've never heard an MD be so apologetic that a study didn't turn out the way it could have. Science Daily article

Posted by Admin at 08:56 AM | Comments (0)

February 11, 2006

Wins and Losses Going to the Legislature

Michigan Acupuncture Registration Act! Michigan SB-351 has passed the state senate and is heading to Governor Granholm's desk! Finally Michigan will have a registration act. For those of you who live in Michigan, take advantage of the AAOM's automatic letter writer where you type in your message and it gets sent directly to the Governor's office. Great system. Click Here

New Jersey's legislative update was scuttled by none other...wait for it...the New Jersey Medical Acupuncturists. Why you ask? Hard to say. Among the highlights contained in the legislation were provisions that would allow Acupuncturists to see a patient without a referral or diagnosis, add herbs, tuina and shiatsu into their scope, and officially have licensure and be able to be called L.Ac.'s. In the law's place would be the holy grail of Acupuncture: Advise and Consent. This magical duo is simply to advise your patients about the importance of consulting a licensed physician about their condition, and having patients sign a form indicating that the acupuncturist provided them with that advice. Glorious. But no. Medical Acupuncture gets in the way. What kills me is that the damn bill was already out of committee and just about ready to be voted on.

If you couldn't tell, I'm a little mad. For those of you who sympathize with Medical Acupuncturist's, I offer you my heartfelt two finger salute.

Posted by Admin at 12:24 AM | Comments (2)

February 09, 2006

Why Ted Kaptchuk's the Man

For those of you who didn't go to school in Boston, and somehow have gone through the life of Acupuncture without hearing the name Ted Kaptchuk (author of The Web That Has No Weaver), you're living under a rock and you need to come out! Ted's focus of late has been on fixing the Western double-blind clinical trial model to work for Acupuncture, which IMHO it doesn't right now.

The British Medical Journal has just published a study of his that pitted placebo versus placebo: Sham-Acupuncture vs. Placebo Pill. At first, it was one versus the other in reducing pain. The winner: no one. The same patients were re-randomized, and then put in a Sham vs Real Acu situation, and a Placebo vs Real Pain Pill one. The winner: Sham Acupuncture. There was a significant difference between the effects of Sham vs the effects of the placebo pill.

Check out the Science Daily Article.

Posted by Admin at 12:31 PM | Comments (3)

February 07, 2006

ACTCM Approved for Doctoral Program

The American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine has received approval from the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine and the California Bureau for Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education, to offer a doctoral program. Students can matriculate starting October 2006. For more information: ACTCM

Posted by Admin at 12:18 AM | Comments (1)